Ancestry AD History 4 Early Modern (1500 to 1700)

AD Early Modern 1485
27/01/2019 BURNT
EARLY MODERN ERA
TUDOR
1485 ⭕️ HENRY VII
1500 CHARLES V HOLY ROMAN EMPEROR (WORLD POP 500M)
1509 ⭕️ HENRY VIII
1547 ⭕️ EDWARD VI
🔹1525 PIETER BREUGHAL THE ELDER
1553 🔺JANE ⭕️MARY
🔹1554 WALTER RALEIGH
1558 ⭕️ ELIZABETH I (NO ISSUE)
🔹1564 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (D.1616)
🔹1564 GALILEO
1567 MONTEVERDI
1571 CARAVAGGIO
1577 RUBENS
🔹1588 SPANISH ARMADA
👤1595 WILLIAM TOMPKYN (♥️G9GRANDFATHER)
1596 DESCARTES
🔹1599 OLIVER CROMWELL (25 APRIL)
1599 VAN DYCK
STUART
➡️UNION OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND & IRELAND UNDER ONE MONARCH, KING JAMES I
THE CLOSEST RELATIVE TO THE CHILDLESS QUEEN ELIZABETH I OF ENGLAND,
(WORLD POP 600M)

AD Modern History 1600

Modern History (1600-)
Tudor PeriodEngland (1485 – 1603)
Reformation Europe (1517 – 1648)
Elizabethan Age England (1558 – 1603)
Stuart Period England/Ireland/Wales/Scotland (1603 – 1714)
➡Age of Enlightenment (1650 – 1800)
➡Industrial Revolution (1700 – 1900)
Georgian Period (1714 – 1830)
Victorian Age (1837 – 1901)
Edwardian Period (1901 – 1910)
➡World War One (1914 – 1918)
Inter War Years (1919 – 1939)
➡World War Two (1939 – 1945)
➡Atomic Age (1945 – Present)
➡Cold War Period (1947 – 1991)
➡Space Age (1957 – Present)
➡Age of Information (1975 – Present)

1603 ⭕️ JAMES I ⬇️ ELIZABETH ⬇️ SOPHIA ⬇️ GEORGE I
➡️1605 THE GUNPOWDER PLOT
1625 ⭕️ CHARLES I (BEHEADED)
1649 THE COMMONWEALTH

Cromwell was sent to Ireland because it was in chaos. The demands of English viceroys led to violent rebellion; rebellion led to the confiscation of rebels’ land and the introduction of English and Scottish planters and settlers. The early Stuart period saw a significant drop in the levels of violence, but no diminution in levels of resentment and injustice. ln the 1630s Charles I’s Lord Deputy, Thomas, Lord Wentworth, later the Earl of Strafford, was sent to Ireland to make it less of a drain on the English exchequer. To that end, he granted more freedom of religion to the Catholics, and raised revenues by making the English settlers disgorge their ill-gotten gains.

When Strafford was attainted and executed by the Long Parliament, the Protestant colonists sought to take their revenge; and the Catholics faced renewed persecution. With English government paralysed in the autumn of 1641, they seized the opportunity for a pre-emptive strike.

Ulster’s dispossessed Catholics rose in rebellion, and as many as 3,000 Protestants were killed and as many again fled to England. Their horror stories, dreadful enough, were grotesquely exaggerated by the English press, and an Anglo-Scottish army was despatched to protect the remaining British-protestant communities. To pay for this army, Parliament passed an Act guaranteeing one fifth of the landmass of Ireland to those who lent £2 million – just over 1,000 socalled ‘Adventurers’ raised the full sum. Cromwell was to make good their claims.

The rebellions in October 1641 launched the Irish theatre of ‘the war of the three kingdoms’. For the next seven years, warfare throughout Ireland was sporadic but vicious. The diary of an anonymous English officer in the winter of 1641-2 includes sickening detail of how he and his fellows shot or hanged civilians and looted and burned the villages they passed through. One British historian says the diary displays ‘the casual cruelty of an SS Einsatzfuhrer on the Russian Front in 1942: It can be matched by confessed activities of the same kind on the other side; although the worst atrocities were perpetrated by the English on the Irish.

By the time of the Regicide in January 1649, Ireland was more devastated, exhausted and bitterly divided even than England. The Royalists, commanded by the Marques of Ormonde, were in uneasy alliance with the Catholic Confederate groups. An army loyal to the Long Parliament controlled the Dublin area, but more than 80 per cent of Ireland was in the hands of those hostile to the English Revolution. Cromwell’s expeditionary force was intended to reverse this situation by incorporating Ireland into the English Commonwealth, placing it firmly under direct rule from metropolitan England. It was also to expropriate enough land to both pay the costs of the conquest and reward English speculators and demobbed soldiers.

Cromwell was in Ireland from 15 August 1649 to 26 May 1650. In that short time he accomplished a more complete control of Ireland than had been achieved under any English monarch; and it led on to the most ruthless process of ethnic cleansing that there has ever been in western European history, with the arguable exception of the Norman Conquest. In the next five years perhaps three-quarters of the land held by predominantly Catholic Irish people was confiscated and redistributed to Protestant Englishmen. At a stroke, the proportion of the land of Ireland held by the former fell from three-fifths to one sixth.

Cromwell spent his time securing control of the east of Ireland, from Drogheda, 30 miles north of Dublin, to Cork in the south. When he left, only four major Irish towns remained to be taken: Waterford, Limerick, Athlone and Galway. His successors, first his son-in-law Henry Ireton, and then Charles Fleetwood, were left with a messy but inexorable mopping up operation.

At the heart of Cromwell’s conquest was his storming of Drogheda and Wexford. They represent a grim legend. In Drogheda more than 3,000 were killed; in Wexford not less than 2,000. They died from artillery bombardment, from gunshots, from sword or dagger thrust, or by bludgeon – Sir Arthur Aston, commander of the Drogheda garrison, was beaten to death with his own wooden leg. Many, perhaps most, were killed in hot blood. But others were killed in cold blood after they had surrendered or been captured. Cromwell ordered none in military or religious orders to be spared.

By August 1652, the reduction of Ireland had effectively been completed. To all intents and purposes, Ireland was at the mercy of the British state. In that month Parliament passed the Act of Settlement proclaiming that it was not their intention to ‘extirpate the whole nation’ but to pardon ‘all husbandmen, ploughmen, labourers, artificers and others of the inferior sort: and to punish those of higher rank ‘according to their respective demerits: But great swathes of people – at least 100,000 – were ‘exempted from pardon of life and estate: The Act provided for the banishment of perhaps as many again; the rest were to lose all their estates and property and were only to be allowed land equivalent to onethird of the value of their current estates ‘in such place in Ireland’ as Parliament would decide – in the event in Connacht or County Clare, except that a sentence of death lay against any of them found within a mile of the coast or of the river Shannon. All clergy and friars were banned from Ireland on pain of death or enslavement. In three of the four provinces of Ireland – Ulster, Leinster and Munster – there were to be no Catholics at all. This was ethnic cleansing on a scale undreamt of by Slobodan Milosevic. But deciding who was to be punished proved beyond the resources of the English state. Thus probably only 200 people were executed under the Act. Only 200? – a long way short of 100,000; but still 200 people executed under the legislative tyranny of the English state.653 🔺OLIVER CROMWELL (D.1658) /RICHARD
1658 THE COMMONWEALTH II
THE RESTORATION PERIOD
1660 ⭕️ CHARLES II (NO ISSUE)
🔹1667 JONATHAN SWIFT
1685 ⭕️ JAMES II (15 CHILDREN) 1ST WIFE ANNE HYDE*B.
1688 THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION
➡️DUTCH ARMADA X4 GREATER THAN THE SPANISH ARMADA
1689 ⭕️ WILLIAM III & ⭕️ MARY (DAUGHTER OF JAMES II) (D.1694,AGED 32) (NO ISSUE)
➡️1701 ACT OF SETTLEMENT (NO PAPISTS) (700M WORLD POP)
1702 ⭕️ ANNE D.1714 (NO ISSUE)
➡️1707 ACT OF UNION
THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
HANOVER
THE GEORGIAN PERIOD
1714 ⭕️ GEORGE I (1 AUGUST 1714) (GREAT-GRANDSON OF JAMES VI AND I)
1727 ⭕️ GEORGE II (11 JUNE 1727 – 25 OCTOBER 1760) (SON OF GEORGE I)

The Protestant Reformation until 1600
1509 Henry VII and the start of the TUDOR Period
1558 The Elizabethan Age until 1603

1620
THE GREAT MIGRATION
The Mayflower and its passengers

1642 & 1648 The English Civil Wars
resulting in the beheading of Charles I in 1649
And the start of the COMMONWEALTH

Early Modern Era
🔵Protestant Reformation 1500 – 1600
1500 🔵EARLY MODERN (1500 – 1750)
Maude WILL (1497 – 1551) (♦️1of 16,400 antecedents)
Protestant REFORMATION (1500-1600)
♦️Maude WILL (1497 – 1551) My 12th great-grandmother
One of 8,000 ggrandmothers alive 500 years ago
Most were probably from England
Some coming over from Holland Germany France
1500 pop about 3million ♦️16,000
♦️Henry SCARBOROUGH (1521 – 1606)

1509 ⭕️Henry VIII (1509 – 1553)
➡️1534 ACT OF SUPREMACY (Break with Rome )
1553 ⭕️Lady Jane Grey (1553 – 1553) (9 days)
⭕️Mary (1553-1558)
1558⭕️Queen Elizabeth I (1558 – 1603) Eliz Age
👤1525 Pieter Breughal The Elder
1547 ⭕️ Edward VI
1553 🔺Jane ⭕️Mary
👤1554 Walter Raleigh
1558 ⭕️ Elizabeth I (No Issue)
____________________________
🔵ELIZABETHAN AGE 1558 1603
⏰1575 ♦️4,096 E Shoosmith g10
Edmund SCARBOROUGH (1584 – 1634)
👤1564 William Shakespeare (d.1616)
👤1564 Galileo
👤1567 monteverdi
👤1571 Caravaggio
👤1577 Rubens
🔹1588 Spanish Armada
1595 William Tompkyn (♥️G9Grandfather)
👤1596 Descartes
🔹1599 Oliver Cromwell (25 April)
👤1599 Van Dyck
======================
1600-1750
STUART PERIOD (1603-1714)
➡️Union of England, Scotland & Ireland under one monarch, King James I
The closest relative to the childless Queen Elizabeth I of England,
(world pop 600m)
🔵JACOBEAN Age 1603 1625
1600 Pop England c. 3.5m ♦️2,000 (UK Pop 4.1m)
Charles (I) born
1603 Mar 24 Death of Queen Elizabeth I
1612 Nov 6 Charles becomes heir to the throne
1617 ♦️b.W Shoosmith g9 (James I travels to Scotland)
Edmund SCARBOROUGH (1617 – 1671)
🔵1625 Mar 27 Charles I becomes King of England
May 11 Proxy marriage of Charles and Henrietta Maria
Jun Charles’ First Parliament
Jun 13 Charles marries Henrietta Maria
Aug 🔴Plague

⭕️James I (1603 – 1625) JACOBEAN
1603 ⭕️ James I ⬇️ Elizabeth ⬇️ Sophia ⬇️ George I
➡️1605 The Gunpowder Plot
⭕️Charles I (1625 – 1649 beheaded)
➡️1642 ➡️1st English Civil War 1646
👤 Isaac Newton 1643 – 1727
1648 2nd eng civil war 1649 ➡️Charles I beheaded
⭕️Charles II (1649 – 1660)
1649 THE COMMONWEALTH
1649 3rd eng civil war 1651

1650 ♦️512 5.3 m (uk) 100,000 scots to 🔴NIreland
♦️1,024
1666 Richard George born ♦️G8Grandfather 🔲🔲Plague Time
1670 (1666) W Shoesmith g7 Randolph (1655)
♦️Mary WEST (1670 – 1767)
🔵1688 THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION absol monarchy to constitutional momarch parliament hade more say _______________________________________________________

➡️1651 THE INTERREGNUM -1660
1653 🔺Oliver Cromwell (d.1658) /Richard
1658 THE COMMONWEALTH II
THE RESTORATION PERIOD
1660 ⭕️ Charles II (no Issue)
👤 1667 Jonathan Swift
1685 ⭕️ James II (11 children) 1st wife Anne Hyde*b.
⭕️James II/VII (1685 – 1688)
🔵 1688 THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION (absolute to constit. monarchy)
➡️Dutch Armada x4 greater than the Spanish Armada
1689 ⭕️ William III & ⭕️ Mary (daughter of James II) (d.1694,aged 32) (no Issue)
======================================
➡️1701 Act of Settlement (no papists) (700m world pop)
1702 ⭕️Anne (1702 – 1714)Last Stuart (no issue)
➡️1707 Act Of Union
1714 THE GEORGIAN (Hanoverian) PERIOD
1714 ⭕️ George I (1 August 1714) (Great-grandson of James VI and I)
1727 ⭕️ George II (11 June 1727 – 25 October 1760) (Son of George I)
==================================================
1700🔵🔵INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION (1700 1900)
♦️John NALDER (1695 – 1795)
🔵🔵 AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT (1700 -1800)
1700 ♦️256M Shoesmith g6 Randolph(1687) 5.2 m (uk)
🔵🔵GEORGIAN ERA 1714 1830🔵🔵
1725 ♦️128
♦️Maria NALDER (1726 – 1796)
1735 (1737) S Stace g5 (128) Will Button (1714)
____________________________
1750
MID – MODERN (1750 – 1914)
♦️William DARLING (1748 – 1828)
1770 ♦️64 (b.1769) S Stace Will Button (b.1746) 5.74m
♦️Joseph DARLING (1786 – 1858)
🔵1789 french revolution

Burnt

I am an Amateur Gynaecologist with a love of Maidenhair Ferns and a fondness for interpreting Vermeer's Paintings as Metaphors ...

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